Photo of Elizabeth Brooks

December 28, 2006

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Photos of Ann Brooks (7th Wife)

December 28, 2006

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Profile: G. Merrill Andrus

December 27, 2006

Grant Merrill Andrus, who goes by the name of Merrill, was born on 15 July 1925 in Ucon, Bonneville County, Idaho, the son of Grant Munday Andrus, who went by the name of Grant, and May Walker Andrus. Grant, born and raised in Ucon, Idaho, is the son of Robert Andrus and Lovenia Bawden Andrus. Robert is the son of Milo Andrus and Jane Munday Andrus.

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Update Mailing Information

December 27, 2006

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Become a Member/Make a Donation

December 27, 2006

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December 27, 2006

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December 27, 2006

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Timeline of Milo Andrus’ Life (including the births of all 57 children)

December 25, 2006

(The mother’s initials follow each child’s name. Scroll to the bottom for a key to the initials.)

Events in Milo’s Life Birthdates of Milo’s Children
1814 Born March 6, in Jay Township (now Wilmington), Essex County, New York.
1816-24 Moved with family to Dunkirk, New York; Henrietta, Ohio; and East Norwalk, Ohio.
1830 Moved to Florence, Ohio.
1832 Mother Azuba Smith died.
1833 Married Abigail Daley.
Baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Ordained an Elder.
Served two short missions in Ohio.
Mary Jane (AD)
1834 Marched to Missouri and back as a member of Zion’s Camp.
1835 Ordained a member of the Quorum of the Seventy.
Served mission to New York.
1836 Helped build the Kirtland temple and was present at the dedication.
Called as president of Florence, Ohio branch.
James (AD)
1836-37 Led Florence branch to Caldwell County, Missouri. Settled just south of Far West.
1837 Sarah Ann (AD)
1838 Due to mob persecution, moved from Missouri to Adams County, Illinois (southeast of Nauvoo).
1838-40 Served 3rd mission to Ohio.
1841 John Daley (AD)
1842 Moved to Nauvoo, Illinois.
1844 Called as bishop of Nauvoo 5th ward.
Served 4th mission to Ohio. Activities included campaigning for the presidential candidacy of Joseph Smith.
Helped build Nauvoo temple.
1845 Received endowment in the Nauvoo temple and served as an ordinance worker.
Called as president of one of the Quorums of Seventy.
Millennium (female) (AD)
1846 Due to mob persecution in Nauvoo, moved to Council Bluffs, Iowa and then to Winter Quarters, Nebraska.
1847 Remained in Winter Quarters to grow crops for Saints going west. Amanda Ann (AD)
1848 Married 2nd wife Sarah Miles. Milo Jr. (SM)
1848-50 Served 1st mission to England. Served as president of the Liverpool conference.
1849 Father Ruluf Andrus died.
1850 Led his 1st wagon company of 51 wagons and 206 people across the plains to Salt Lake City.
1851 Divorced by 1st wife Abigail Daley.
Married 3rd wife Lucy Loomis .
2nd wife Sarah Miles died.
1852 Married 4th wife Adeline Alexander.
Married 5th wife Mary Webster.
1853 Laron Alexander (male) (AA)
1854 Sent from Salt Lake City to be president of the St. Louis stake. Marlon Webster (MW)
Lavenia (LL)
Henrietta (AA)
1855 Led his 2nd wagon company of 461 people across the plains to Salt Lake City.
Married 6th wife Elizabeth Brooks.
Married 7th wife Ann Brooks.
Married 8th wife Jane Munday.
Lewis (AA)
1856 Millard (JM)
1857 Married 9th wife Margaret Boyce.
Served as a Major in the Utah Militia during the Utah War.
Alwilda Nancy (AB)
Alma (male) (LL)
Marinda (MW)
1858 Served as bishop of Big Cottonwood ward.
Married 10th wife Emma Covert.
Josephine (JM)
1859-61 Served 2nd mission to England. Served as president of the Birmingham district. Lyman (MW)
Charles (AB)
Isadore (MB)
Helena (EC)
Jacob (LL)
1860 Andrus halfway house built by 3rd wife Lucy Loomis at Dry Creek (now Sandy), Utah.  (The halfway house was moved to Utah’s This is the Place State Park in 1981.) Liona (AA)
Sarah Jane (JM)
1861 Led company of 600 Saints from England to New York on the ship Underwriter.
Lead company of 900 Saints to Florence, Nebraska by train.
Lead his 3rd wagon company of 38 wagons and 620 people to Salt Lake City.
1862 Married 11th wife Francenia Tuttle. Hyrum (MB)
Randolph (AA)
Orson (twin) (AB)
Parley (twin) (AB)
Selestia (EC)
Lucy (MW)
1863 Byron (FT)
Laura Elizabeth (LL)
1864 Divorced from 4th wife Adeline Alexander. Mary Emma (EC)
Walter Sheridan (MW)
1865 Esmarilda (LL)
1866 Mansfield (MB)
Oscar (FT)
Sherman (JM)
1867 Grant Webster (MW)
Florence (EC)
1868 Brigham Boyce (MB)
Heber (JM)
1869 Elizabeth (EC)
Minnie (MW)
1869-70 Called to mission in the eastern states.
1870 Clarence Eugene (AB)
1871 Ernest Amos (FT)
Newton (JM)
1872 Horace (MB)
Carrie (EC)
1873 Sent to St. George, Utah to organize and serve as chairman of the United Order.
Helped build the St. George temple.
Robert (JM)
Nellie (MW)
1874 William Spencer (EC)
Margaret Ann (MB)
1874-81 Served on the high council of the St. George stake.
1876 Laura (MW)
1877 Benjamin Boyce (twin) (MB)
Joseph Boyce (twin) (MB)
1880 Evaline Charlotte (MB)
1881 Sent to colonize Blake City (now Green River), Utah.
1882 Moved to Salt Lake City, Utah.
Appointed chaplain of the council of the Utah Legislature.
1884 Moved to Oxford, Idaho.
Called as stake patriarch.
1886 Remarried 1st wife Abigail Daley.
1893 Died at Oxford, Idaho, June 19.

Total Children: 57 (41 living to adulthood)

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KEY — Milo’s Wives

1. Abigail Daley (AD)
2. Sarah Miles (SM)
3. Lucy Loomis (LL)
4. Adeline Alexander (AA)
5. Mary Webster (MW)
6. Elizabeth Brooks (EB)
7. Ann Brooks (AB)
8. Jane Munday (JM)
9. Margaret Boyce (MB)
10. Emma Covert (EC)
11. Francenia Tuttle (FT)

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Timeline of Milo Andrus’ Life

Timeline of Milo Andrus’ Life (including major events in LDS Church history)

“I Am Willing to Do My Duty in All Things”: Milo’s 1st Report from St. Louis (July 1854)

December 22, 2006

Milo Andrus served as the president of the St. Louis stake from 1854 to 1855 at a time when St. Louis was an outfitting center for Mormon migration to the West. In a letter to President Brigham Young, written on July 15, 1854, Milo gave a report of his activities. The original letter resides in the LDS Church’s Historical Department.

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Photo: Milo’s Original Gravestone

December 22, 2006

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Photo: Milo in the 1890s

December 22, 2006

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Photo: Milo Andrus in 1885

December 22, 2006

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Photo: Milo Andrus in 1890

December 22, 2006

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On Pioneer Missionaries by D. Calvin Andrus

December 22, 2006

D. Calvin Andrus (Jane Munday) is the great-great grandson of Milo Andrus.  He delivered this address in 1997 while serving as the LDS bishop of the Sterling Park Ward in Sterling, Virginia.

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Introduction

This last week we have been engaged in Stake Youth Missionary Week. Last Sunday the Young Women and Young Men went to a kick-off fireside at the Hamilton Building. While there we heard the inspirational testimony of a young man from the Leesburg Ward who was baptized about a year ago, and is now waiting for his own mission call. We also heard the story of a young woman who told of the conversions of her aunt and grandfather as the result of good examples. Finally, President Hamula, of the Washington, D.C. South Mission, told of the rescue of the Martin Handcart company, and likened the rescue of their temporal lives, to the modern day rescue of the spiritual lives of our friends and family.

On Friday evening the Young Women and Young Men of our ward participated in the rescue of our forebears though baptisms for the dead at the Temple. A number of your children had prepared for this event through genealogical research and the submission of names to the temple. At one point, Bro. Jason Mikels and I were confirming Peter Hale as a proxy for a deceased brother while Bro. Randy Hymas was recording. The room was full of other young men reverently waiting their turn. During this confirmation the Spirit bore strong witness to me that this is the Church of Jesus Christ, that these are the saving ordinances, and that these young men were doing the work of the Lord. A little later in the evening, the series of baptisms with our young men as proxies was interrupted for two patrons with three family file names. The temple workers brought out a chair so that the confirmations could be done right after the patrons came out of the water. The temple worker asked me to be the voice in two of the confirmations. At this time the Spirit was very strong, witnessing to me that these deceased people are very real and they take these ordinances very seriously.

Last night our young people went to a reader’s theater at the Hamilton Chapel. They were to invite a non-member or less active member to attend with them. Some of the young people in our ward did just that. The reader’s theater was the story of a young woman named Elizabeth who joined the church in England and migrated to Nauvoo by herself. There she met her husband, David. While crossing the plains, David left with the Mormon Battalion and Elizabeth crossed the plains by herself. David and Elizabeth were reunited in Utah. (And lived happily ever after!)

After the reader’s theater, refreshments were provided in the cultural hall, which was ringed with a number of displays by the full-time missionaries and the Stake YM and YW. Later, those 14 years and older went to the Stake Dance and had a good time.

Pioneer Missionaries

The reader’s theater reminded me of a different couple that had lived in Nauvoo. Their names were Milo and Abigail. Their story begins before Nauvoo, however. Milo and Abigail joined the church near Kirtland in 1832. They were married one year later–he was 19 and she was 18. Over the next 3 years, Milo served two missions and went on the Zion’s Camp trek from Ohio to Missouri and back. In 1836, Abigail had one child and one on the way. The three and 1/2 of them attended the dedicatory services of the Kirtland Temple. The couple also received the limited temple ordinances that were given at Kirtland. Milo, now aged 22, was called to be the branch president over the Florence, Ohio branch with the specific instructions to move the whole branch to Missouri.

The Florence branch left Ohio in the fall of 1836 and went as far as Terre Haute, Indiana where they wintered over. They reached Far West in the spring of 1837, early enough to put in the crops. While in Far West, Milo and Abigail attended the ceremony when the corner stone of the Far West Temple was laid. However, less than a year after arriving in Far West, in February 1838, Milo and Abigail and their now three children were forced to flee. They spent a very cold month in a wagon, reaching Quincy, Illinois in March 1838. Milo and Abigail moved to Nauvoo and built a comfortable house on the corner of Mulholland and Horner streets. They lost a child in the malaria epidemic that swept the city in the summer of 1839.

In the fall of 1839, just after the Apostles left for their famous mission to England, Milo–now aged 25–was called on a mission to Canada, from which he returned in the spring of 1840. In 1841 the couple attended the ceremony when the corner stone of the Nauvoo Temple was laid. Thereafter, Milo donated every tenth day to work on the Temple. By 1843, Milo–now aged 29–had served another short mission to Indiana and was called to be Bishop of the Nauvoo 5th Ward, which included the Temple site. The ward was three blocks wide and 32 blocks long. He and Abigail had two more children.

In 1844, Milo was part of the group of Elders sent out to advocate the Presidential Candidacy of Joseph Smith, and was in southern Ohio when the Prophet was killed. At the October General Conference of 1844, Milo was called into the First Quorum of the Seventy. One year later, in the fall of 1845, Milo and Abigail received their endowments in the Nauvoo temple and spent 6 weeks as temple workers there.

In the spring of 1846, Abigail was 31 and Milo was 32. They and their four living children left Nauvoo and drove a wagon to Winter Quarters. Milo and Abigail were chosen to stay behind and farm in Winter Quarters during the summer of 1847 so there would be food for the Saints who were on their way to the Salt Lake Valley. They were told that they could join the main body of the Saints going to the valley in the Spring of 1848. Just before they were to leave for the valley, Milo received another mission call–this time to England. Abigail, at age 33, took the now 5 children across the plains by herself in the Heber C. Kimball wagon train. She would not see her husband for two years.

When Milo’s mission was finished he was assigned to lead a group of Saints from England to Salt Lake. The trip took them from Liverpool to New Orleans, up the Mississippi and then across the plains. He lead 55 wagons and 206 people to Salt Lake.

Once in Salt Lake the pioneering was not over. Milo settled south of Salt Lake. Four years later, in 1854 he was then sent back to St. Louis, Missouri to be the Stake President. The next year they shut down the St. Louis Stake and Milo brought the whole stake of 880 people across the plains, arriving in October of 1855 at age 41. In 1856, members of the Martin Handcart company found their way into Milo’s home in Salt Lake. In 1859, Milo was sent back to England on another mission. When this mission was over, he led his third wagon train to Utah. This group of 337 people arrived in Utah in 1861.

After three crossings of the plains, Milo was sent to colonize St. George. (This just proves the old adage that "No good deed goes unpunished.") While in St. George, Milo helped build his third temple. After 10 years in St. George, at age 67, Milo was sent to colonize Emory County near the Green River. (And I thought I was too old to go camping.) After leaving Emory County, he settled in the Idaho part of Cache valley in 1884 at the at of 70. Milo finished out his days there as the Stake Patriarch.

Modern Day Pioneer Missionaries

So why do I tell this long story of my great, great, grandfather Andrus? Milo and Abigail were pioneers before and after they crossed the plains–not just while they crossed the plains. And their pioneering was mixed with missionary work. And both their pioneering and missionary-ing were mixed with temple work. This is the kind of experience the young men and women of our stake have had this week: missionary-ing, temple-ing, and pioneering. They all go together.

We are pioneers. Nobody before us has lived in a world like ours. It is our assignment to cross the plains of the last days to the valley of the Millennium. And this pioneering is inextricably intertwined with missionary work and temple work. May we be as faithful as those who went before us.

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Related Links

D. Calvin Andrus’ Website
Dr. Calvin Andrus is the Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Mission Innovation at the Central Intelligence Agency. Over a 23 year career, he has served as a regional political analyst, IT program manager, and enterprise applications architect. He awarded the Intelligence Community’s 2004 Galileo Award for his paper, "The Wiki and the Blog: Toward a Complex Adaptive Intelligence Community." He received a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. from the State Universtiy of New York at Stony Brook. His general area of interest lies at the conjunction of intelligence analysis, innovation, and information technology. His current work focuses on the Intelligence applications of virtual world technology. He is married with 5 children.

The Genealogy of Milo Andrus

December 22, 2006

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A Brief History of Abigail Jane Daley

December 22, 2006

Born: 26 January 1815
Place: Marcellus, Onondaga, New York
Died: 27 October 1894
Place: Richmond, Cache, Utah

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The Anderson Report: December 2006

December 22, 2006

The Andrus Organization has made it possible for Laura Anderson to spend a total of 12 weeks back in Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas Etc., and more recently 4 weeks in Vermont and New York, following Ruluf’s descendants to where they settled, obtaining pictures of headstones, and obtaining life histories of Ruluf’s children and descendants in the hopes that one of them can shed some light on our ancestry.

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Wives

December 22, 2006

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Abigail Jane Daley

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Sarah Ann Miles

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Lucy Loomis Tuttle

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Adeline Alexander

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Mary Ann Webster

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Elizabeth Brooks

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Ann Brooks

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Jane Lancaster Munday

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Margaret Ann Boyce

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Emma Covert

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Francenia Lucy Tuttle

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“From the Time I First Heard Elder Andrus Speak…”: The Conversion of Henry Eyring

December 22, 2006

Henry_eyring Henry Eyring (1835-1902) was born in Coburg, Germany. He was living in St. Louis, Missouri when he first heard the preaching of Milo Andrus, a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He later joined the church in March 1855.

The following account of Henry Eyring’s conversion and of his subsequent activities is taken from "The Journal of Henry Eyring, 1835-1902," pages 18-21.

He is the ancestor of noted chemist Henry Eyring, Camilla Eyring Kimball (wife of LDS Church President Spencer W. Kimball), and Henry B. Eyring (currently an LDS Church apostle). 

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The summer of 1854 was very dry and hot, the river at Cincinnati becoming so low that people could wade across it without hardly wetting their knees. While in St. Louis I read at different. times articles about the Mormons, representing them to be a sot of thieves, cut-throats and the very off-scourings from the earth. Hearing that several companies of that people had come to St. Louis, I apprehended danger to the public safety and felt it hardly safe in the streets after night. On the morning of December lOth, 1854 I happened to hear that the Mormons held meetings in a chapel cor. of 4th Street and Washington Av. Feeling a curiosity to see some of these desperate characters I went to their meeting on the evening of the same day. I arrived there rather early and discovering a bench near the door I concluded to locate myself there, thinking if anything serious should happen I could readily make my escape to the street. After occupying that bench for a while and watching the people who were now coming in gradually I discovered that they were a friendly, sociable people who certainly did not have the appearance of cut-throats. Upon this I took courage and actually ventured to seat myself in the gallery.

Time for meeting having arrived the choir sang, "Who are those arrayed in white brighter than the noon-day sun?" Having been used to the slow solemn church music of Germany, I was rather unfavorably impressed with the lively tune sung by the choir and imagined to discover something fanatical in the performance.

Singing over, Elder Milo Andrus arose and opened by prayer. Here was another stunter; his lively quick manner of speech was so much in contrast with the slow, measured tone of orthodox Christian ministers that I was almost shocked at his seeming lack of piety. After singing again by the choir Elder Andrus addressed the congregation in an attractive and fluent manner. On Monday Morning Dec. llth I went as usual to my place of business. I mentioned to my fellow Clerk Hopkins, that I had been to a Mormon meeting and found it quite attractive. Win. Brown, our porter, standing by, felt pleased at my favorable mention of the Mormons and finally acknowledged that he himself was a member of the Church.

I told him I was pleased to hear it, as I wanted some further information about that people. In the afternoon he handed me a Voice of Warning by Elder P. P. Pratt, which I read through on Monday night and returned to Bro. Brown on Tuesday morning. He asked me how I liked the book. I told him there were many interesting things in it, but as to believing in angel’s visits or visions I could not do that.

I will here say that for some years previous to that time I had discarded all belief in revealed religion, had no connection with any church, but believed in the necessity of virtue, morality and honesty. Just prior to my hearing the true gospel, I had become to some extent dissatisfied with my infidel notions and I used to reflect like this: "When I was a zealous Protestant, I prayed and went to meeting and had an inward peace and joy which I measurably lost after becoming an infidel, and although I could not possibly return to my former Christian convictions, yet I felt a something lacking which infidelity could not possibly furnish me.

I was in that condition when I heard the truth and I fully believe that Providence so led me as to hear it at the right time, when my mind was susceptible to good impressions.

From the time I first heard Elder Andrus speak until now I have always attended the meeting of the Latter-day Saints, and the instances are very rare indeed, when I failed to go to meeting, it being at the same time my duty to do so.

I name this in my history that my children may imitate my example and never neglect this very important duty of assembling with the Saints.

“The Saints Are Rejoicing And Bearing Testimony”: Milo’s 2nd Report from St. Louis (October 1854)

December 22, 2006

Milo Andrus served as the president of the St. Louis stake from 1854 to 1855 at a time when St. Louis was an outfitting center for Mormon migration to the West. In a letter written in St. Louis, October 20, 1854, Milo gave the Deseret News a report of his journey east and of his activities in St. Louis and the surrounding area. His letter was published in January 4, 1855.

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About the Organization

December 22, 2006

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Meeting Minutes

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Life History of Mary Ann Webster

December 22, 2006

Children: Marlon W., Marinda (Hardy), Lyman, Sheridan, Grant W., Laura (Hill)

By Dean Andrus (great-grandson of Mary Ann, grandson of Marion, son of Marion Edwin).

Mary Ann Webster, fifth wife of Milo Andrus, was born in Windle, Lancashire, England, July 30, 1834, the seventh child in a family of fifteen children born to Henry and Ann Rigby Webster. The family joined the Latter-day Saints Church in Lancashire, England. Mary Ann was baptized March 21, 1848, at fourteen years of age. Her name was entered on the St. Helen’s Branch of the L. D. S. Record along with other members of the Webster family. She with her parents and brothers and sisters crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the ship, Josiah Bradley, that sailed from Liverpool, February 18, 1850.

After a pleasant voyage, the company arrived in New Orleans, April 18, 1880. The family sailed up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri, and from there they traveled to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where her father and sister, Rachel, age eighteen, died in December 1880. Her brother, Henry Edward, age fourteen, died in July 1881, from the effects of sun stroke.

The spring of 185~ she and others of her family prepared to cross the plains. Margaret, age fifteen, was working for David Dixon’s family. The Dixon’s crossed the plains in one of the early 1852-pioneer companies, taking Margaret with them and arriving in Salt Lake valley before the Webster family. Mary Ann, with her mother and five younger children, crossed the plains in the Uriah Curtis Company. The family went to live at Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake County, and while living there Mary Ann became acquainted with Mito Andrus and his family. She became his fifth wife on December 28, 1882.

Dean Andrus writes: “Mary Ann Webster Andrus’s life was an unassuming one, but full of sacrifice in the pioneer development of this state.” He also explains: “In pioneer days, she resided at what was called the half-way house on the state road south of Salt Lake City.” Again: “Due to the constant service for the Church by Milo Andrus, much of the responsibility of raising the family rested on the shoulders of Sister Andrus, and in addition to working out means of providing the daily necessities, she instilled within the hearts of her children a deep-seated and unwavering faith in the Restored Gospel which was the guiding light of her soul. She accepted Mormonism wholeheartedly at her conversion in England in 1850, and, in turn, this was the impelling force which brought her to Utah within a short period.”

From Kate B. Carter compilation we learn: “She accompanied her husband when he was called to go to Green River on a mission in 1881. Shortly after they arrived May 14, 1881, she sent her twelve-year-old daughter, Minnie, to the river for water. Minnie lost her balance, fell into the river and was drowned. This was a great sorrow to Mary Ann.” (Green River is in the state of Wyoming. ) Quotation also from the Garter account says: “She also lived for a time at Oxford, Idaho, when her husband moved to that locality. She was well acquainted with President Brigham Young, and often enter- rained him in her home on his travels from place to place.” Dean Andrus states: “She has related many interesting experiences of these visits of President Young to her granddaughter, Maude Hardy Spiers.”

The Carter record concludes: “Mary Ann Andrus spent her later years with her daughter, Marinda Andrus Hardy, in Salt Lake City where she was a Relief Society worker in the Twelfth Ward. She was unassuming, faithful and a true pioneer mother. She died in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1902.”  (References to Kate B. Carter’s work are from Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. XIV, pp. 24q-248.

Life History of Margaret Ann Boyce

December 22, 2006

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Life History of Lucy Loomis Tuttle

December 22, 2006

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Life History of Jane Lancaster Munday

December 22, 2006

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Life History of Francenia Lucy Tuttle

December 22, 2006

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Life History of Emma Covert

December 22, 2006

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Life History of Elizabeth Brooks

December 22, 2006

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Life History of Ann Brooks

December 22, 2006

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Brief Biography of Adeline Alexander

December 22, 2006

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Andrus Half Way House Selected for Pioneer Trails State Park

December 22, 2006

While Milo was serving his second mission in England (1859-1861) he directed his family to build a hotel in Jordan Bottoms where he had filed for 160 acres of land. This area was also called Dry Creek, and is now part of Sandy, Utah.

The article reprinted below originally appeard in The Pioneer, the official publication of the National Society of the Sons of the Utah Pioneers. The article was was written by Russell Stocking and appeared in the July-August 1979 issue. The hotel was moved to Utah’s This is the Place State Park in 1981.

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Meet the Family

December 22, 2006

This page is where you can find out a little more about your family members. Write a brief profile or history of yourself and we will post it here. Tell us about your hobbies, favorite books, websites, music, and contact information if you like. You can also include pictures. In the future we will also highlight members of the family and tell about their special achievements (oldest living members, etc.).  Click here to submit your profile or history.

Laura Anderson: How Accurate is Milo’s Autobiography?

December 22, 2006

Family Researcher Laura Anderson: I feel it important to put Milo’s autobiography into historical context, as there are numerous points that are likely the way he remembered them, but not historically verifiable.  He would have been about 60 at the writing, with no records to go from.

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Milo Andrus, the author of this biography, is the son of Ruluf Andrus and Azuba Smith. My father is a native of Hartford, Connecticut, and my mother of Rutland, Vermont. [LA: Milo’s older brother and sister, Almon and Harriett, in an 1880 census say Ruluf was born in Vermont.] They shortly after marriage [LA: Ruluf and Azuba were married in about 1795.]  moved to Essex County, [LA: In 1800 Ruluf is listed in Poultney, Vermont as "Rufus."] state of New York, where they resided until their ninth child was born–seven boys and three girls, namely: Oran, Almon, Carlo, Erasmus, Harwin, Milo and Milo 2nd. Erasmus, Harwin, and Milo 1st died in childhood, the dates of their deaths I cannot give in consequence of a fire that burnt up the records of my father’s family. The names of sisters were Sybil, Sarah, and Emily. My eldest brother, Oran, was born in 1797 [LA:10 Apr 1798]; Sybil was born in 1799 [LA: 23 Apr 1796]; Almon was born in 1801 [LA: 10 Apr 1800 in Poultney, Vermont.]; the dates of the others I cannot give.

The writer of the above, Milo 2nd, was born March 6th, 1814. When five years old, my parents moved to Dunkirk, state of New York, where they resided one and a half years. During that time there was a circumstance occurred, that seems to me to show the protecting hand of the Lord over me. I went to the shore of Lake Erie and got into a skiff on the shore and went to sleep, when the wind arose and took the skiff on the lake, and it was not seen until nearly out of sight. I was then picked up still sound asleep. I have always thought that the Angel of Peace then watched over me. [LA:The timing of this story is off, as the family moves to Brownhelm, Huron, Ohio (later called Henrietta) in the fall of 1817,  which puts the 18 month time frame back to about April of 1816.  This would make Milo just barely 2 when he moved to Dunkirk and 3-1/2 when he left.  Perhaps the family visited Dunkirk when Milo was 5 years old.]

My parents then moved up the lake into the state of Ohio, in Huron County, township of Henrietta, [LA: Henrietta is not formed until 1827-8] where they had three daughters born, namely: Eveline Charlotte, born October 7th, 1817; Lucina, born 1819 [LA: According to the census and her family records she is born March 11, 1816, which would have been in the Dunkirk, New York era.  If Milo’s date for her birth was correct she would be married and having children by age 14.]; Harriet, born 1821. At the writing of this the two eldest of my brothers are still alive and three of my youngest sisters. [LA: This puts the writing of the biography between Carlo’s death in 1870 and Oran’s death in 1874.] They have all rejected the gospel. [LA:  I believe that others in the family may have joined the church and then rejected it.]

My mother died January 1st, 1832. My father died in the winter of 1848 [LA: 1849]. I shall now drop the history of the balance of the family, and give a few incidents of my own history.

After the death of my mother, I bought the balance of my time until I was twenty-one of my father, for which I paid him one hundred and fifty dollars. In the spring of 1832, I met an elder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, though I should say, previous to this, that I had my mind much exercised about a future state, and had read the views of Alexander Campbell, and that being the nearest to the truths of the New Testament, I had been baptized by Elder Orson Hyde, [LA: We have records that the Baptist church of Henrietta with Squire Abbott at the head had united with the Campbellites in 1828.] then a minister of that section; but when I compared the scriptures with the teachings of the elder of The Church of Christ, I found that he had the truth; after trying for nearly one year, I yielded to baptism.

One month and nine days previous to my baptism, I was united in marriage to Abigail Jane Daley, whose father had been baptized into The Church of Christ about one year before. We were married February 21st, 1833, baptized April 12th, 1833. [LA: In fact according to county recrods the marriage was recorded on the 14 of Feb.] I was ordained an elder May 5th, 1833, under the hands of Joseph Wood. Started on my first mission in June, 1833, in company with Joseph Wood, traveled a distance of seventy miles preaching every day and baptized three. [LA: Joseph Wood was a church leader who later united with the RLDS Church.] We came to Kirtland where the Prophet Joseph Smith resided with his family. The quarterly conference that came off in a few days after our arrival, changed my traveling companion, and I was coupled with Ova Truman. Joseph Wood and his fellow laborer went to Philadelphia, and I with my new companion was sent to the southern part of the state of Ohio, to return in three months to the next quarterly conference. We were not very successful and baptized only two persons. After this conference, I was permitted to return home and preach among the branches until winter, when we had a call from the Prophet Joseph by his brother Hyrum to get ready and go with the company of elders to the state of Missouri, known as "Zion’s Camp." Our first daughter and first child was born November 15th, 1833. During the winter of 1833 and spring of 1834, we were instructed to labor and get all the money that we could, and to get good rifles, and make ready to start by the first of May, 1834. We accordingly started from Florence, Huron County, Ohio, on the 7th of May, 1834. These were from the Florence branch; Nelson Higgins, Hyrum Blackman, Asey Fields, and Milo Andrus. My brother-in-law, James Daley, went with us [Zion’s Camp] as far as Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, where we met with the Prophet Joseph, his brother Hyrum and the rest of the camp from the East. Our leader was Elder Orson Hyde [LA: Orson Hyde’s cousin Rebbecca Hyde married an Ebenezer Andrews/Andrus of Milan about a mile from Ruluf’s hotel. I do not know of a connection yet, but it is interesting.].

There was one circumstance that occurred before we joined the main camp worthy of notice. As stated before, I had bought my time from my father, and had paid him the amount agreed upon, but still I was not twenty-one by ten months. On this account, and as he was so opposed to my going with the "Mormons," as he called them, he made an effort to stop me. As we had to pass his house on our way, [LA: The hotel (that we have a picture of on this site) is near Norwalk on the way from Florence. I believe this is the area that Milo is talking about.] we learned his intention to stop me at the county seat, Norwalk; and Brother Hyde had learned his plan, he went in and made inquiry about a road that we did not intend to travel, and then Brother Nelson Higgins and myself were directed to go around the city and take the road to Mansfield,  [LA: Nelson Higgins is later in the First Quorum of the Seventy with Milo, and is tied into the Henrietta settlers by a tie to the Durands.  Ruluf would have recognized him and gone looking for Milo.] and he and the sheriff thinking that we would move slow, did not want to overtake us until we had camped, accordingly father, sheriff and driver drank freely, [LA: Where were they drinking?  Ruluf had a liquor license for his hotel in 1834.  I believe the hotel in East Norwalk is where Orson Hyde found them and asked after the wrong road.] and when they started they took the road to Tiffin, that had been inquired after to mislead them, and they drove until long after dark, the team becoming tired they gave up the chase and heard of us the next morning forty miles on the road to Mansfield, and they felt as though they had been badly sold, and gave up and went home.

On the 11th of May, we joined the main [Zion’s] camp west of Mansfield, and on the 12th the camp was organized, and the law of consecration was for the first time presented and we shelled out to the last cent, and our money went into a commissary’s hands and our supplies were bought by him. I shall not try to name the particulars of this journey. We journeyed on causing considerable excitement, and receiving much good instructions from the Prophet Joseph.

After we got into the state of Missouri, or rather, before our company had crossed the Mississippi River, we went into the dense forest as a company, and there offered up to the Lord our fervent prayers, that He would spare our lives, and permit us to return to our families, and we felt that it would be so, and thanks be to the Lord not one of us were taken by the cholera that visited the camp that afternoon.

Two weeks after we landed on Fishing River, in Clay County, Missouri, where the revelation was given June 22, 1834 [D&C 105], that is recorded on page 345 in Book of Doctrine and Covenants [D&C 105]–New Edition of 1876. About this time the cholera made its appearance among us, as it had been predicted by the prophet. Thirteen of our good brethren were taken away by the dread monster. The camp broke up partly, and the Saints scattered around and the Lord turned away the scourge. After staying there three weeks, the Lord permitted us to return. We got back to our families the last of September, 1834, care-worn and much fatigued. I had the cholera on the way home, but the Lord healed me, and then we went on our way rejoicing.

The summer of 1835, I traveled in the state of New York with Nathan Baldwin, baptized several, and the following winter went to school in Kirtland, and in the spring of 1836, I was in Kirtland at the dedication of the temple and the endowment of the elders that the Lord had promised as a reward for their offerings. The blessings of the Lord were poured out abundantly. There is one thing that I would here relate, that was a great joy to me, and that was when the Holy Ghost was poured out on the elders, I saw fire descend and rest on the heads of the elders, and they spoke with tongues, and prophesied.

On our return to Kirtland from the mission in the East, I went to school in Kirtland, studied grammar, and then studied Hebrew under Professor [Joshua Seixas] of New York.

On going back to Florence, Ohio, I was chosen president of the Florence Branch, with instructions to move them to Missouri in the fall of 1836. We went as far as Terre Haute, Indiana, when being late and c
old, we put up for winter. Our eldest son, James, was a babe three months old, and we came near losing him to human appearance, but the hand of the Lord was in it. We raised up a branch of the Church in that place.

Early in the spring of 1837, we started for Missouri, and arrived in Caldwell County in time to put in a crop. In 1838, we were mobbed out of the county. We had one child born in Missouri, a girl, namely: Sarah Ann. We went to Illinois in the winter of 1838 and the next summer we lost our little girl born in Missouri.

In the fall, after I had the chills and fever for two months and not able to scarcely walk, I was sent on a mission to Canada, but owing to the Patriot War, we were not permitted to go to Canada, and I spent the winter preaching in the state of Ohio–returned home in the spring of 1840, and spent my time in laboring and preaching in the counties around Nauvoo until the spring of 1844. I was then sent to the state of Ohio with Elder John Loveless. We traveled in the south part of Ohio for two months, when we heard of the assassination of the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum. We went home as quick as steam would take us, arrived in time to see their mortal remains, before they were interred. I then went to Carthage Jail, where they were murdered, and saw the floor stained with the best blood of the present generation. The people were all fleeing for fear of justice overtaking them. I called at Hamilton’s Hotel to see Elder John Taylor, who was wounded in the jail. Then went to Adams County, where my family had fled for safety. Found them well but much alarmed. [LA: We have always assumed that he meant his immediate family of Abigail and the children, but we now know that his uncle-in-law Uriah Hancock, and wife Polly (or Mary) Smith die in Adams County in 1850 and 1855 respectively.  Many of the Hancock cousins live in Adams County for some years.  See Hancock genealogy.]

After we had mourned the loss of our prophet and patriarch a few weeks, during which time I was chosen one of the Nauvoo police, I helped to watch the city by night and worked on the [Nauvoo] temple by day–got it so that the work of the endowments commenced in the fall of 1845 and winter of 1846. I spent six weeks of the time in the temple and was much blessed.

During the past four years, we had two more children born, namely: John D. Andrus and Millennium. After the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, I was ordained one of the presidents of the 10th quorum of seventies. In the winter of 1846, my house, in the basement, was made into a wagon shop, and in the spring I started on our journey to the west. We overtook the main camp at Pisga, and from there went to Council Bluffs, where the government called on us for a battalion of 500 men to go to Mexico. After the battalion was started, I was sent forward with others to the number of one hundred and fifty wagons; went as far as the Pawnee Indian village, then went 150 miles to the northwest among the Ponca Indians. After staying there two months, we went back to Winter Quarters, stayed and farmed in that county in the year 1847, and in the spring of 1848, I was sent on a mission to England. Shortly before I left, Sarah Ann Miles was sealed to me, and she accompanied me to England.

We arrived in Liverpool the first of August, and on the 13th of August [1848] at a general conference, I was appointed president of the Liverpool Conference, which place I filled to the best of my ability until January, 1850, when I was released to come home. During my stay in that conference there were three new branches added and between two and three hundred added to the Church by baptism. I baptized thirty in one evening. The Lord made manifest His power in healing the sick and in blessing the Church with signs following the believers. Milo, Junior, was born in Liverpool, September 30th, 1848.

We left Liverpool in January, 1850, on board of the ship, Argo. Jeter Clinton presided over the company, we were eight weeks and three days on the ship from Liverpool to New Orleans; some sickness and two deaths on the passage. I was sick with the cholera, my wife had poor health all the way, Milo, Jr. was sick; we thought that he would die, but the blessings of the Lord brought us through. We came up the Mississippi River on board the steamer "Uncle Sam", Captain Van Dosen, master. We landed at Kanesville early in May; was organized in the first company of Saints early in June. I was chosen captain over 55 wagons. We had a good time on the plains, arrived in Salt Lake City on last day of August, having but one death on the journey, that of a stranger going to California. I baptized 15 persons on the journey. James Leithhead and Richard Hopkins were clerks of the company. A more full account of the mission to England is recorded in the 10th quorum of seventies record.

After one week’s rest, I went to work in the 19th ward and built me a house; and about the 1st of January, 1851, my wife, Jane, and I parted. In June, 1851, I married the Widow Tuttle, and the November following my wife, Sarah Ann Miles died. I married Adaline Alexander in March, 1852. In December, 1852, I married Mary Ann Webster.

In the spring of 1854, I was sent to Saint Louis to preside over the stake there. Stayed there one year, rebaptized and confirmed about 800 saints. Was sent up the river to buy cattle for the emigration of 1855, and in the fall was appointed by E. Snow and D. Spencer to bring the last company of 63 wagons home; arrived in Salt Lake City in October, and in December same year, married Elizabeth and Ann Brooks and Jane Munday. In February, 1857, married Margaret Boyce and in February, 1858, was married to Emma Covert. Was acting bishop of Big Cottonwood ward in 1858, and in the fall of 1859 was appointed to another mission to England. The first six months I was appointed to travel in the conferences; the last nine months I presided over the Birmingham District, embracing Birmingham, Warwickshire, and Staffordshire Conferences.

In the summer of 1861, I started for home with 700 saints on board the ship "Underwriter." I was appointed president of the company, had a good passage to New York; no deaths. I was then appointed to take charge of 900 to Florence, Nebraska, on the cars. Stayed at Florence five weeks, and was then appointed captain to take a company of 66 wagons across the plains, and arrived in Salt Lake City in September, 1861. In the fall of 1870, I married Francena Tuttle. In the fall of 1870, I was again sent to the states on a mission. Came back in the spring of 1871. Since that time I have been in Utah on the home missionary list, and to work with my hands for a living. At this date, January 9th, 1875, I am living in St. George, Utah.

Life History of Sarah Ann Miles

December 22, 2006

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Top Ten Things To Do To Get More Involved with Your Heritage

December 21, 2006

1. Take a trip to an historical site – Visit the About Milo section for maps and driving tours of places you can visit.

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2. Read a book or article on the website about Milo.

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3. Submit a history or photo of yourself, your parents, your grandparents, or one of your kids to the website.

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4. Plan a reunion with your cousins.

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5. Volunteer with the family organization.

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6. Join the family organization.

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7. Make a donation.

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8.

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9.

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10.

President’s Message: August 2006

December 21, 2006

Dear Milo Andrus Decendants,

New things are coming on the Milo Andrus Web Page. Robert Andrus, our web master, has been joined by Andy Andrus and John Garett Taylor on the web staff.

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Andrus Recorder Archive

December 21, 2006

Recorderlogo_1

The Andrus Recorder was a newsletter published by the family organization from 1964 to 1984.  It’s purpose was to promote genealogical research, compile historical materials such as personal histories, journals, etc., and, enable family members in general to contribute. Hyrum L. Andrus (Jane Munday) served as the editor during those years.

 

Volume 1, Number 1 — October 1964

President’s Message 1 — Andrus Family Officers 1 — Reunion (1963), 1 — Need for Wife-line Reps Notice 2 — News Note 2 — Genealogical Report 2 — Andrus Family ID Code 2 — Our Immediate Responsibilities in Genealogy 2 — Ruluf Andrus Research 2 — Research and Study Project 2 — Genealogical Finances 2 — Family Histories, Autobiographies, etc. 2 — Autobiographical Sketch by Milo Andrus 3

Volume 1, Number 2 — February 1965

Over the Hills and Far Away 1 — Announcing 1965 Reunion Holiday, Utah 2 — Historical Information 2 — History of Elvira, Ohio 2 — Genealogical Section 2 — Wife-line Chairmen 3 — Finances 3  — Genealogical Mission to Ohio 4

Volume 1, Number 3 — June 1965

President’s Note 1 — Ruluf Andrus Information 1 — Reader’s Responses to Recorder 1 — 1965 Reunion: Agenda & Committees  2 — Report of Ohio Trip: Ray & Faye Andrus  2 — Biographical Materials: Ruluf Andrus by Edna Townsend  4

Volume 1, Number 4 — November 1965

President’s Message 1 — New Recorder Information Editor 1 — News Notes 1 — Open House for ‘Aunt Till’ 2 — 1965 Reunion Report: 300 in attendance  2 — Genealogical Section 4 — New Appointments 5 — Crossing the Plains in 1850: Milo Andrus  5 — Writing Life Histories Checklist 10

Volume 2, Number 1 — June 1966

President’s Message 1 — Announcing 1966 Andrus Reunion—Spanish Fork, Utah 1 — What’s Happening 1 — Andrus Family Officers 2 — Genealogy Section 2 — Milo Andrus in St. Louis: Part One 2 — In Memoriam: Marlon Andrus 6

Volume 2, Number 2 — July 1966

President’s Message 1 — 1966 Reunion Outline and Program 1 — What’s Happening 2 — Genealogy Section 2 — Hyrum Andrus Message 2 — Report by Mrs. Townsend 2 — Mission to Ohio Report 2 —  Milo’s Nauvoo Property Located   9

Volume 3, Number 1a — January 1967

President’s Message 1 — Family Reunion Report (Spanish Fork) 1 — Thomas Andrus appointed Finance Chairman 2 — Family News 2 — Genealogical Section 3 — Milo in St. Louis: Part Two — Short History of Juletta Berrett Andrus  14

Volume 3, Number 1b — April 1967

President’s Note 1 — Notice for 1967 Reunion in St. George 1 — Financial Statement 1 — In Memoriam: “Aunt Zill” Rozilla Andrus Porter 1 — A Letter of Interest 1 — Genealogical Section 2 — The Day and Age of Milo Andrus 2 — 1967 Reunion Committees 4

Volume 3, Number 2 — October 1967

President’s Message 1 — A Bit of History—Pearl H Nordick 2 — Report of the St. George Family Reunion 2 — News Notes 3 — Genealogical Section 3 — Milo Andrus’ Second Journey to England 4 — Short History of Life of Emma Covert & Family 5

Volume 4, Number 1 — March 1968

President’s Message 1 — Charlie’s Farewell to Milo 1 — News Reports 2 — Reunion Notice: Ucon, Idaho 2 — Genealogical Section 2 — Report on the Andrus-Smith Problem 3

Volume 4, Number 3 — December 1968

President’s Message (new Pres. –Thomas E. Andrus) 1 — 1969 Reunion Notice—Canada 1 — News Briefs 1 — Genealogical Section 2 — Ruluf Andrus Research Report 2 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column 3 — Notes on Milo Andrus 3 — Life History of Isadore Andrus Larson 5 — Message to the Family 5 — Life History of Millard Andrus 6 — Life History of Minerva Deseret Terry Andrus 6 — Family Group Sheet of Ruluf Andrus 7

Volume 5, Number 1 — April 1969

President’s Message 1 — Genealogical Section 1 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column 1 — Family of Milo Andrus 3 — Life History of Jane Munday Andrus 3 — Memories of  Josephine Andrus Thompson 4 — News Item: Benjamin W. Andrus dies  5 — Family Group Sheet of Milo Andrus/Abigail Jane Daley  7

Volume 5, Number 2 — December 1969

President’s Message 1 — Minutes of Andrus Reunion in Canada 1 — Genealogical Section 2 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column 2 — Life Story of Sarah Ann Miles Andrus 3 — Life Story of Milo Andrus Jr. 4 — Life Story of Elizabeth Boyes Andrus  6 — Family Group Sheet of Milo Andrus/Sarah Ann Miles 8

Volume 6, Number 1 — March 1970

President’s Message 1 — 1970 Reunion in July in Draper 1 — Genealogical Section 2 — Life History of Lucy Loomis Tuttle 2 — The First Hotel In Spanish Fork 3 — The Life of Alma Andrus 3 — The Life of Serena Gardner Andrus 5 — Sketch of the Life of Newton Andrus 7 — News Notes 8 — Notice: Need Updated Addresses 8 — Reference Chart Family of Milo Andrus 9 — Family Group Sheet Milo Andrus/Lucy Loomis 10

Volume 6, Number 2 — October 1970

President’s Message 1 — Announcement: 1971 Reunion in Holiday 1 — Minutes of 1970 Reunion 2 — Genealogical Section 3 — Ruluf Andrus Column 4 — Family of Milo Andrus 7 — Adeline Alexander 7 — Autobiography of Dolph Andrus 7 — Life of Matilda Sandberg Andrus 9 — Life or History of Heber Andrus 10 — Life of Ann Ireland Bawden Andrus 12 — Life History of Joseph Boyce Andrus 13 — Life History of Emma Maude Gee Andrus 15 — Family Group Sheet of Milo Andrus/Adeline Alexander 16

Volume 7, Number 1 — April 1971

President’s Message 1 — Pictures: Robert & Lovenia Andrus Family 1 — Reunion Notice: Holladay, July 1971 1 — Genealogical Section 2 — Life History of Sarah Jane Andrus 2 — Life History of Sherman Andrus 2 — Life History of Robert Andrus, Son of Jane Munday 3 — Life History of Lovenia E. Bawden Andrus 4 — Missionary Journal of Milo Andrus in England 7

Volume 8, Number 1 — February 1972

President’s Message 1 — Pictures: Milo & Mary Ann Webster Family 1 — Report on July 31, 1971 Reunion 2 — Milo Andrus Honored 2 — Racing Tribute to Mel Andrus 2 — Life History of Mary Ann Webster 2 — Genealogical Section 3 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column (Orin Andress, Almon Andress) 3 — Log Book of 1861 Ship "Underwriter" of Liverpool 5 — Christening Entry: Mary Ann Webster 10 — Marriage License: Mary Ann Webster 10 — Family Group Sheet: Milo and Mary Ann Webster 11

Volume 8, Number 2 — August 1972

President’s Message 1 — Reunion Announcement: St. George 1 — Genealogical Section 1 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column (Almon Andrus) 2 — Journal of Company No. 5 1861 3

Volume 9, Number 1 — April 1973

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Milo & Ann Brooks Family 1 — Family Reunion: Provo June 15-16, 1973 Chairman A. LaMar Andrus  2 — Genealogical Section 2 — Life History of Ann Brooks Andrus 2 — Ann Brooks’s Piano 4 — Life History of Orson Andrus 4 — Life History of Mary Alberta Williams 5 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column (Newton Andress, Will of Carrie C Andrus) 5 — Family Group Sheet: Milo & Elizabeth Brooks 10 — Family Group Sheet: Milo & Ann Brooks 12

Volume 9, Number 2 — September 1973

President’s Message 1 — Pictures: Millard and Newton Andrus Families1 — 1973 Reunion Minutes 2 — Genealogical Section 4 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column 4 — Posterity of Jane Munday & Milo Andrus 9 — Burial Places 9 — Past Publications on Jane Munday Family 9 — Life Sketch of Heber Andrus 10 — Portrait of Newton Andrus 11 — My Mother, Juletta Berrett Andrus 14 — Life Sketch of Robert Andrus 16 — Legal Documents of Munday Family 18 — Family Group Sheet: Milo & Jane Munday 25

Volume 10, Number 1 — February 1974

President’s Message 1 — Pictures Margaret Ann Boyce Family 1 — Family Organization Meeting October 6, 1973 2 — Genealogical Section 3 — Ruluf Andress Family Column 4 — Sally (Sarah) Minerva Andress — Obituaries: Alma ‘Arch’ Andrus 5 — Emily A. Andrus 6 — Mary C. Andrus 6 — Howard P. Andrus 6 — Ruth C. Andrus 6 — Life Sketch of Margaret Ann Boyce 6 — Life Sketch of Hyrum Andrus 7 — Life Story of Virginia Garner 10 — Life Sketch of Mansfield Andrus 11 — Reunion Announcement: June 29, 1974 12 — Family Group Sheet: Milo & Margaret Boyce 14

Volume 10, Number 2 — April 1974

President’s Message: A Proposed Constitution for the Milo Andrus Family 1 — Reunion Announcement: June, Idaho Falls, Idaho 3 — Next Recorder to feature Emma Covert 4

Volume 10, Number 3 — December 1974

President’s Message 1 — New Family Officers 2 — James A. Andrus, President — Board of Directors Meeting Minutes Oct 5, 1974 4 — Genealogical Section 5 — Obituary: Eula Leavitt Andrus 5 — Ruluf Andress Family Column: Minerva Andress Powers Abbott 5 — History of Milo Andrus 8 — History of Rose Victoria Bateman 12 — Family Group Sheet: Milo and Emma Covert 14

Volume 11, Number 1 — May 1975

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Family of Francenia Lucy Tuttle 1 — Board of Directors Meeting Minutes 2 — Reunion Notices 4 — Deaths of Family Members: Zola K. Andrus and Orvid R. Cutler 4 — Ruluf Andress Column 5 — Life of Francenia Lucy Tuttle 6 — Life of Francenia Lucy Tuttle 7 — Life Sketch of Oscar Andrus 7 — Life Sketch of Lucy Emeline Houghton Andrus 8 — Family Group Sheet: Milo and Francenia Lucy Tuttle 10

Volume 11, Number 2 — December 1975

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of James Andrus Family 1 — General Meeting Andrus Organization 2 — Ruluf Andrus Family Column: Life Sketch of Mary Jane Andrus & William 4 — Dorris Hendricks 6 — Life of Laura Altah Gibson Andrus 9 — Life of Manomas Lovina Gibson Andrus 10 — Notice of 1976 Reunion: June 25 and 26  12 — Family Group Sheet: Wm Dorris Hendricks and Mary Jane Andrus 13 — Family Group Sheet: James Andrus and Laura Arvilla Altha Gibson 15 — Family Group Sheet: James Andrus and Manomes Lovina Gibson 16

Volume 12, Number 1 — May 1976

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of William Fredrick Fisher Family 1 — Executive Board Minutes 2 — History of Abigail Jane Daley Andrus 4 — Memories of Millennium Andrus Fisher 5 — Experiences of Wm. Edgar Fisher 11 — Victor Russell Fisher 15 — History of Howard Ransom Egan 17 — Life of Mary Jane Andrus Hendricks 19 — Family Group Sheet: John Daley Andrus and Cynthia Caroline Wheatherbee 27 — Family Group Sheet: Wm. Frederick Fisher and Millennium Andrus 29 — Family Group Sheet: Howard Ransom Egan and Amanda Ann Andrus 31

Volume 12, Number 2 — December 1976

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Abigail Jane Daley 1 — Report Andrus Reunion June 26, 1976  2 — Exec. Board Meeting Minutes 3 — Ruluf Andress Family Column 4 — Family Background of Abigail Jane Daley 6 — Conversion of Henry Eyring 7 — Interview with Manomas Lavina Gibson Andrus 8 — History of Millennium Fisher and William Frederick Fisher 12 — Brief History of Oxford, Idaho 15

Volume 13, Number 1 — June 1977

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Sarah Ann Miles Family 1 — Andrus Family Meeting Minutes 2 — Obituaries: Grant Macfarlane, Joseph Daley Andrus 4 — First Milo Andrus Sr. Reunion (early 1900’s) 4 — Ruluf Andress Family Column: Emily Andress 5 — Milo Way, Holladay, Utah 6 — Life Story of George Boyes 7 — Life Sketch of Elizabeth Taylor 8 — Life Story of Milo Andrus, Jr. 10 — Life Story of Elizabeth Boyes Andrus 13 — Family Group Sheet: Milo and Elizabeth Boyes 17

Volume 14, Number 1 — January 1978

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Alma Andrus Family 1 — Reunion Notice for Sept. 1-3, 1978   1 — Exec and Board Meeting Minutes 2 — Genealogical Section 4 — Biography of Esmeralda Andrus McKell 4 — Biography of Alma Archabald Andrus 8 — Journal of Alma Archibald Andrus 10 — Family Group Sheet: Alma Andrus & Serena Gardner 25 — Family Group Sheet: James Miller & Lavenia Andrus 27 — Family Group Sheet: Wm. James McComb & Lavenia Andrus 29

Volume 15, Number 1 — March 1979

President’t Message 1 — Special Issue: Milo Andrus 2 — Biographical Sketches 4 — Mission to England 13 — Journey to America 28 — Emigrant Company of 1850 29 — Life in Salt Lake Valley 1850-54 38 — Life at Mormon Grove 63

Volume 15, Number 2 — August 1979

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Milo’s & Wives Grave Stones 1 — Executive & Board Meeting Minutes 2 — Report on 1978 Reunion 4 — Obituaries 9 — Andrus Graves 9

Volume 15, Number 2b — December 1979

President’s Message 1 — Pictures of Milo Home in Sandy 1 — Milo Andrus, History Part II 2 — Emigration Company of 1855 6 — Life In Salt Lake Valley 1856-59 12 — Second Mission to England 1859-61  16 — Journey to America 1861   27 — Immigrant Company of 1861   36 — The Dry Creek Hotel 42 — Life in Salt Lake Valley 1862-1872  46 — The United Order 50 — Life in St. George 52 — The Green River Mission 63 — Life in Oxford, Idaho 63

Volume 16, Number 1 — April 1980

President’s Message 1 — Reunion Notice: June 28, 1980 1 — Genealogical Section 1 — Executive & Board Meeting Minutes 2

Volume 18, Number 1 — May 1982

President’s Message 1 — Robert McKell Family Pictures 1 — Executive Committee & Board Meeting Minutes 2 — Death of Charles H. Andrus 3 — William B. McKell Progenitors 3 — Autobiography of Robert McKell 5 — Historical Note on Robert McKell 11 — History of Elizabeth Boyack 11 — History of Robert & Elizabeth McKell 13 — Tribute to McKell Family 18 — History of Wm B. & Esmarelda Andrus
McKell 18 — Life Story of Lucy Tuttle McKell 20 — Robert Dewey McKell 21

Volume 19, Number 1 — February 1983

President’s Message 1 — Minutes of Executive Committee Meeting 2 — Letter from Pioneer Trail State Park 3 — Andrus Half Way House 4 — Additional Information On The Half Way House 5 — The Pioneer Home of Milo Andrus in Cresent, Utah, 1858   6

Volume 20, Number 1 — May 1984

President’ Message 1 — Pictures of Randolf Andrus Family  1 — History of Adaline Alexander Andrus 2 — Life Sketch of Steen Sandberg  5 — Memories of Bengta  Kronvall  6 — Autobiography of Randolph Andrus  6 — Biographical Sketch of the Randolph Andrus Family 7 — Family Reunion Announcement  21

The Autobiography of Milo Andrus

December 21, 2006

Milo wrote his autobiography in about 1873 while living in St. George, Utah. He lived another 20 years, dying in 1893.

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Milo Refutes Gladden Bishop

December 21, 2006

After the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, several apostates endeavored to lead members away from the main body of the Church. One of these was Gladden Bishop. As President of the St. Louis Stake, Milo Andrus found it necessary to repudiate the claims of Bishop. The St. Louis Luminary for February 17, 1855, carried the following discourse dealing with apostate movements and the law of tithing.

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Hyrum L. Andrus’ Introduction to the 2004 PDF Edition of the Andrus Recorder

December 18, 2006

TO THE ANDRUS FAMILY AND OTHER INTERESTED PERSONS

At the time I was appointed the Genealogical Chairman of the Milo Andrus Family I was participating in a BYU Education Week program and was not present at the Reunion. Yet I appreciated the honor the family placed on me and I determined to promote the genealogical research, which a few individuals in the family had been carrying on by their own efforts, in a way that would enable family members in general to contribute.

I was also aware that there were historical materials regarding family members that existed, such as personal histories, journals, etc. J. Roman Andrus was President of the Family Organization, so I suggested to him that we publish a family newspaper and the name The Andrus Recorder was given to the proposed paper. Roman devised the mast head for the paper and we published the first issue in October 1964. To finance the paper and our family research we proposed that each family contribute a specified amount.

The Andrus Organization was composed of Central Officers and Wife Line Chairpersons who were asked to collect historical materials and promote genealogical research on their respective lines. I took the initiative in getting the family group sheets for each of Milo’s wives thoroughly researched and made available to the family. The records which I received when asked to serve as the Genealogical Chairman were very sparse, with many inaccuracies. In this task I turned to the genealogical institution in Provo that was headed by J . Grant Stevenson and utilized his skills and staff and in time we had authenticated Family Group Sheets for each of Milo’s wives. I also gave attention to the problem of determining the parentage of Ruluf Andress and Azubah Smith, who were Milo’s parents. The Ruluf problem still needs solution, but I did find, while working in the Historical Department of the LDS Church, in Salt Lake City, that Milo was baptized in the Mississippi River for John and Sarah Smith, the parents of Azubah.

There were key members of the family who contributed to the Recorder, but I shall not mention their names for fear of missing some who should be mentioned. As I look back over the years, I remember with fond feelings of gratitude those who were willing to go the extra mile to publish the issues that were given to the family. Those were very busy years for me, with many pressures on my time, which increases my appreciation for their interest and efforts. I was released from these responsibilities and asked to write a history of Milo, or to get one written, so I turned to my longtime friend and colleague on the Religion Faculty, Ivan J. Barrett, who, during his later years at BYU, was without doubt the man who best knew the details of church history in the broad sweep from 1820 to the turn of the nineteenth century. Though much of the book, Trumpeter of God (1992) had to be improvised to put Milo in the given historical settings, Professor Barrett’s insights into the details of church history gave accuracy to the general picture. Before he finished the manuscript his health failed him and I found it necessary to write some of the chapters of the book. I also carefully read the total manuscript and made additions along the way, where it seemed appropriate to do so.

I do hope that every effort will be made to make these issues of the Recorder available to the family, and heartily commend those who are doing this important work.

Hyrum L. Andrus
Alpine, Utah
June 14, 2004

Photo: Milo Andrus in 1883

December 13, 2006

Milo_1883_2

 

 

 

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[Click to enlarge.]

This is Milo Andrus in approximately 1883.  He would have been 69 years old.

Announcing the 2007 Milo Andrus Family Reunion

March 24, 2006

Salt Lake City, UT
June 15-16, 2007

Come connect with your heritage.

Andrushouse_4

Activities will include:

  • Touring Milo Andrus’ home at “This is The Place” Heritage Park
  • Making new friends and connecting with old ones
  • Reports on the newest genealogical information
  • Election of new family organization officers
  • Displays and presentations on Milo and his family
  • Wife line meetings

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Schedule
(All activities are provided to you free of charge.)

Friday, June 15, 2007

All Day
Attend the Bountiful and Salt Lake Temples
(For descendants of Milo who are members of the LDS Church. See below for information on organized sessions. Update: There will be no oragnized sessions, however, we encourage you to attend sessions in small groups or on your own.)

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Evening
Individual Wife Line Meetings
Various locations (see details below)

Saturday, June 16, 2007

8:30am-9:30am
Pancake Breakfast
LDS Chapel — 4032 S. 2300 E., Holladay, Utah. See map below.

Picture displays for each wife line will be set up during breakfast (if you have pictures to show related to your wife line, please bring them, they will also be used in displays in the afternoon)

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9:30am-11:00am
Business Meeting
LDS Chapel — 4032 S. 2300 E., Holladay, Utah. See map below.

  • Genealogical Research Update
  • Financial Report
  • Web Site Report
  • Election of General Officers (president, vice-president, secretary/treasurer, research coordinator, and information coordinator)
  • Reports from Wife Line Representatives
  • Preview of the events of the rest of the day

11:00am-3:00pm
Free Time
Suggested activities:

  • Visit Milo’s grave site in Holladay (See map below.)
  • Tour “This Is The Place” Heritage Park with your family. (See map below. Admission to the park will be provided by the family organization.)
  • Lunch on your own

1:00pm
Reunion
Registration Opens — “This is The Place” Heritage Park

The Bowery at “This is The Place” Heritage Park
(See map below.)

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1:00pm-3:00pm
Historical Displays, Entertainment, and Brief Presentations About Milo and His Family
The Bowery at “This is The Place” Heritage Park

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3:00pm-4:00pm
Program: “The Life and Wives of Milo Andrus” — a new play written about Milo Andrus and each of his wives. Written and researched by DeLane Andrus Hyer and Laura Anderson, it represents hundreds of hours of work and will be fantastic.
The Bowery at “This is The Place” Heritage Park

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Admission to “This is the Place” Heritage Park will be paid for by the family organization. When entering the park, identify yourself as part of the Milo Andrus family.

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This information will be updated as more details become available.

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Maps

Breakfast and Business Meeting

LDS Chapel
4032 S 2300 E
Holladay, Utah

Reunion_church

This chapel is across the street from Olympus High School, near the LDS Seminary building.

“This Is the Place” Heritage Park

“This Is The Place” Heritage Park is located at the entrance of Emigration Canyon, in the north east area of Salt Lake City. It is just south of the University of Utah and accross the street from Utah’s Hogle Zoo.

For more information about the park visit the “This Is The Place” Heritage Park Website.

Milo’s Grave Site

Memorial Estates Cemetery, 4900 Memory Lane, Holladay, Utah

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Wife Line Meetings

Friday, June 15, 2007

Abigail Jane Daley

  • Place: LDS chapel, Pleasant View 1st/2nd/3rd Ward, 650 East Stadium Avenue, Provo, Utah (north side of Provo MTC.)
  • Time: 6:30pm
  • Contact for more information: Dale C. Andrus (pdandrus@connect2.com)

Sarah Ann Miles

  • Place: LDS chapel, Holladay 18th/28th Ward, 2625 East Milo Way, Holladay, Utah (turn east on Holladay Blvd. at 4910 South.)
  • Time:4:00pm-8:00pm
  • Contact for more information: Irene Witmer (irenewitmer@yahoo.com)

Lucy Loomis Tuttle

  • Place: LDS stake center, 4th North and 5th West, Spanish Fork, Utah
  • Time: 5:30pm-9:00pm
  • Contact for more information: Cyrus Milo McKell (cmmc1@xmission.com )

Adeline Alexander

  • Place: LDS chapel, Bountiful 12th Ward, 1476 North 300 West, Bountiful, Utah
  • Time: 5:00pm-9:00pm
  • Contact for more information: Berwyn Andrus (berwyn@xmission.com)

Mary Ann Webster

  • Details coming soon.

Ann Brooks

  • Place: LDS chapel, Holladay 18th/28th Ward, 2625 East Milo Way, Holladay, Utah (Turn east on Holladay Blvd. at 4910 South.)
  • Time: 10:00am-1:00pm
  • Contact for more information: Katherine Bowthorpe (foursocks1@hotmail.com)

Jane Lancaster Munday

  • Place: Benson Grist Mill, 325 Highway 138, Stansbury Park (Tooele County), Utah (Directions: Take I-80 West from Salt Lake City. Take Exit 99 to State Route 36 South. Turn right on State Route 138 in Mills Junction.)
  • Time: The reunion will begin at 5:00 p.m. The park will be open from 3:00 p.m. for your use.
  • Dinner: There will be a very large grill for cooking meat. Everyone should bring their own meat dish to cook on the grill. In addition, everyone should bring a pot luck dish of their choosing. Plates, cups, utensils, drink and dessert will be provided. If you live close by you might think about providing dishes needing refrigeration and those from further away could provide items that do not require it. There will be activities for children, a short business meeting, and lots of time for visiting.
  • Contact for more information: G. Rich Andrus (andrusr@srv.net)

Margaret Ann Boyce

  • Place: Olympus LDS stake center, 2675 East 4430 South, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Time: 6:00pm-9:00pm
  • What to Bring: Historical photos and family histories to share.
  • Contact for more information: Afton Buchanan (bawk3683@sbcglobal.net)

Emma Covert

  • Place: The home of Ronald M. Morgan, 1158 Moyle Drive, Alpine, Utah
  • Time: 6:00pm
  • Contact for more information: Ronald M. Morgan (ronrilla@comcast.net)

Francenia Lucy Tuttle
(Combined with the Lucy Loomis Tuttle meeting)

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